Volume 7, December 2015 Volume 7, December 2015

  1. THE IMPACT OF PUBLIC-ASSISTED CONTRACT FARMING PROGRAMMES IN MALAYSIA

    Full Text Download here
    Author(s): 
    Bisant Kaur, Nitty Hirawaty Kamarulzaman, Nur Amalina Hamzah
    Keywords: Contract farming, income, farmer, high impact project, Malaysia

    Abstract:Under the Ninth Malaysia Plan (9MP), contract farming was introduced as a high-impact project under the Ministry of Agriculture and Agro-based Industry (MoA) to revitalise the agricultural sector as Malaysia's third pillar of economic growth. The programme had the objectives of providing assured markets and of increasing producers' incomes. Eight departments/agencies under the MoA were given the responsibility to provide assistance and facilitate farmers to ensure the success of the contract-farming programme. The objective of this study was to evaluate the contract farming programme to determine whether it had fulfilled its objectives in terms of production, number of farmers involved, and incomes of farmers.  Face-to-face interviews using semi-structured questionnaires were carried out with 107 contract farmer located in the states of Kelantan, Terengganu, Selangor, Johor and Perak.  This study revealed that the contract farming programme had improved the production of agricultural products and increased farmers' average total incomes after five years. It was also found that after involvement with the contract farming programme, majority of the farmers marketed their entire produce through the Federal Agricultural Marketing Authority (FAMA).

  1. PURCHASING INTENTION TOWARDS ORGANIC FOOD AMONG GENERATION Y IN MALAYSIA

    Full Text Download Here
    Author(s):
    Siti Hasnah Hassan, Loi Wai Yee, Kok Jean Ray
    Keywords: Consumer, food safety, health factors, Malaysia, organic food, perceived value, perception, purchasing intention

    Abstract:  This study questions whether bahulu, as an example of traditional food, can be marketed as a successful tourism product. To answer this question, the study explores tourists' food expectations when bahulu is treated as regular food, and when it is treated as a tourism product. From  analyses  of  in-depth  interview  transcriptions  with  22  willing tourists, the study found that food quality (objective and subjective/perceived)  emerged  as  a  top  expectation  in  both  cases.  The  study also managed to identify three components of food quality: sensory, functional,  and  symbolic  components  as  specific  aspects  of  bahulu as well as the peripherals that can be considered to add value to the attractiveness of the food as a tourism product.
  1. BAHULU ATTRACTION - WHAT IS EXPECTED OF BAHULUAS A TOURISM PRODUCT?

    Full Text Download Here
    Author(s):
    Nabsiah Abdul Wahid
    Keywords: Bahulu,traditional food, value-added product, marketing attraction, tourist consumer's consumption experience, Malaysia

    Abstract: Urban lifestyles have contributed to consumers' need for convenient and nutritious food products. This study is aimed at determining the cost implications of pineapple juice production using ultraviolet (UV) as an alternative (non-thermal technology) to the conventional pasteurisation methods used in small-medium scale juice facilities in Malaysia. The financial analysis involved Contribution Margin, Net Present Value, Payback Period, and Profitability Index of the UV and heat treated pineapple juices. Ultraviolet pasteurisation has relatively lower initial capital development cost than heat pasteurisation. Thus, implementation of UV technology can be more profitable than heat treatment when applied in a small-medium scale pineapple juice processing plant.
  1. CONSUMERS' PERCEPTION AND ACCEPTANCE OF FRESH AGRICULTURE PRODUCT PURCHASED THROUGH E-BUSINESS

    Full Text Download Here
    Author (s): Suhana Safari, Nik Rozana Nik Mohd Masdek
    Keywords: e-business, e-commerce, fresh agriculture product, perception, acceptance, consumption, satisfaction, preference

    Abstract: Agriculture e-business can be viewed as trading models of buying and selling of agriculture produce through electronic means.  e-Business has the potential to reduce transaction costs, improve market access, and information content of products. Generally, e-business is easy to use,  and  a  cost-efficient  system  for  consumers  and  firms.  Malaysia can be considered to be at an early stage of development in online shopping, specifically in agriculture produce. Limited study has been undertaken  in  understanding  consumers'  behaviour  and  perception towards online shopping. Thus, this study was carried out to examine consumer  perception  and  acceptance  of  e-business  for  agriculture produce in Malaysia. Results from the analysis found that most buyers are adult female users aged between 20 and 49 years, with a monthly income of RM1,001 to RM3,000. This group is more open to the idea of  shopping  for  fresh  produce  online,  and  are  more  IT  savvy.  Most Malaysian users prefer to use online banking services rather than debit and  credit  cards.  Meat  and  meat  preparation,  vegetables,  and  eggs are the top-most products consumed by internet users. The minimum amount  spent  is  RM  50  and  the  maximum  amount  spent  is  RM500 per  transaction.  Bearing  in  mind  that  fresh  agriculture  produce  is easily perishable and has a short shelf life, reliable transportation and logistics services are needed. The study also revealed that there is no significant relationship between female and male users in the level of satisfaction. It indicates that both users have an equal perception of all aspects of satisfaction. Furthermore, the study also shows a significant difference  in  gender  preference  whereby  females  prefer  to  purchase online when compared with their male counterparts. Overall, online shopping has the potential of becoming an alternative shopping channel in the future. Indirectly, it may also change Malaysian shopping trend from the conventional system to online retailing system.
  1. PRELIMINARY STUDY ON THE MARKETING OF PICKLES IN MALAYSIA

    Full Text Download Here
    Author(s): Norhashila Ismail
    Keywords:Pickles, supply chain management, marketing chain management, fruits, vegetables, Malaysia

    Abstract: Pickles are products produced for generations as a way to preserve fruits and vegetables. The purpose of this study is to provide new base knowledge regarding the pickle industry in Malaysia. One hundred and twenty nine respondents from a group of pickle manufacturers were interviewed using questionnaires.  These manufacturers obtained their supplies of raw materials from farms, supermarkets or from their own crops. However, due to the small scale production and its seasonal nature, the manufacturers also sourced raw materials from farmers' markets or night markets in small quantities according to their current manufacturing requirement.  Some of the raw materials such as mango, kelubi and salak are imported from Indonesia or Thailand.  The study found that 89% of the manufacturers do not use machineries when making pickle. The majority of manufacturers, that is 91.40% from the total surveyed, pickled the fruits and vegetables in brine solution. More than half of the respondents added citiric acid to the brine solution during the pickling process. From the findings of this survey, manufacturers believed that mango pickles have the potential for further development in the future and is the consumer favourite right now. Even though Sabah has its own special pickle, compared to other states in Malaysia, there are not many pickle manufacturers there.

» Back